Roundtables

Small-gauge as Environmental and Ordinary

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With this contribution to this issue's roundtable discussion, Scott Rodgers prompts us to think about how small-gauge modes of communication and scholarship are reconstituting the "environment" of the academic world.

Small-Gauge Storytelling

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In this entry to our small-gauge roundtable, Carla Nappi ponders the role of the scholar as an "explorer-stumbler," and the importance of storytelling as an act of worldmaking.

The Genealogy of Small Gauge

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In this entry to the small-gauge roundtable, Kevin T. Allen explores the genealogy of the term "small-gauge" inside and outside of its media contexts, and discusses its applicability to his own work.

Small-Gauge Scholarship: An Introduction

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Mediapolis co-editor Brendan Kredell introduces this month's roundtable discussion, on the concept of "small-gauge" scholarship. How do changes to the way we’re talking to one another affect the things we are saying to each other?

As Chicago Goes, So Goes the Nation?

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Beginning the second round of our Policing and the Media roundtable, Brendan Kredell considers how the McDonald killing fits into a history of police violence in Chicago and across the nation.

The Past Remains Present

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In this Policing and the Media entry, Joy Bivins explores the vulnerability of young black bodies and contrasts the legacies of Emmett Till and Laquan McDonald.

A Private Grief Made Public

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In this post in our Policing and the Media roundtable, Margaret Schwartz considers how spectacular police violence imperils the right to grieve in private.

Framing a Shooting (and a Movement)

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In this entry in our Policing and the Media roundtable, Steve Macek explores the backstory of the Laquan McDonald shooting and the different ways that Chicago media outlets covered the story.

Policing and the Media: An Introduction

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Among the thirty seven people shot by police in 2014, it is Laquan McDonald’s death that has catalyzed public reaction; thanks to the existence of video documentation, we can see what happened with our own eyes. This seemingly simple observation belies a much more complex set of issues regarding the relationship between policing and media in the contemporary moment. With this roundtable, we seek to investigate those in some greater detail.