• Policing and the Media: The View from Chicago

    Policing and the Media: The View from Chicago

    A Roundtable

March/April 2016

vol. 1, no. 2

Urban Topographies of Global Imagination

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In “Urban Topographies of Global Imagination,” Josh White investigates the geographical dimensions of global governance and its disjunction from the imaginaries of global communion that appear in contemporary popular culture, including the television program, Sense8. White’s analysis includes a critical examination of Michel Foucault’s “heterotopias.”

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The Challenges (and Rewards) of Teaching Media Infrastructures through Popular Culture 

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Joshua Synenko introduces the papers featured in the inaugural issue of the Student Voices section. In it, he explains the context for his course, Contemporary Topics in Media Studies, where he had his students focus on the relationships between media and urban geography with a particular focus on urban infrastructures and geomedia. He provides brief overviews of the student work featured in the section.

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The Extended City Symphony

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Welcome to the first installment of “From the Archive,” a new recurring section highlighting archival-based scholarship and practice in urban media studies. To start things off, Floris Paalman discusses how the ideas of “database cinema”  informed the curation of the Extended City Symphony Program at EYE Filmmuseum’s ResarchLab. 

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Public Feeling: Rethinking Memorials and Monuments

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Beyond acting as lightning rod for continued social and political divisions today, might there also be other cultural shifts related to monuments and memorials in public space at play? Recent literature on the contemporary memorial landscape from the field of art history engages with the shifting terrain of public feeling and performative utterances in the increasingly mediated contemporary city, analyzing both its pitfalls and its strengths in countering the presumed monolithic power of the monument.

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SCMS 2016

Spaces of Spectatorship: Architectures of the Projected Image

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Moving-image installations and media architecture have recently given renewed currency to established notions of dispositif, apparatus, and spectatorship. These concepts have allowed for new inquiries into the relationships among screens, viewers, and space in the urban context. In this Polished Panel, the participants use close analyses of peripheral practices of projection to illuminate the centrality of architecture to spectatorial experience.

Methodologies of Race and Space

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Mediated cityscapes often reinforce the stigma associated with devalued areas and the underprivileged, yet can also undermine dominant perceptions and counter misrepresentations of place. In this Polished Panel, the participants map that tension that emerges between real and represented places, using a spatial approach to race to trace formal and industrial practices that create meaningful linkages among spaces, places, and bodies.

Mapping Urban Horror

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Of all popular film genres, horror perhaps makes the most consistent and flexible use of space. This use maps out landscapes of power, repression, and displacement. In this Polished Panel, the participants propose to use horror as a map of gentrification and its spectre of racialized violence.